No more warning signs for Mobile Speed Cameras in NSW

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The NSW Government has announced major changes to NSW’s mobile speed camera program, which includes an increase in enforcement hours, a reduction in high visibility livery on vehicles and, most significantly, the removal of warning signs.

 

The purpose of these changes is “about changing culture and changing behaviour. We’ve seen it happen with our world-leading mobile phone detection program, where the rate of people offending has steadily declined. No warnings signs mean you can be caught anywhere, anytime and we want that same culture around mobile speed cameras.” The removal of warning signs is set to roll out over the next 12 months and will bring NSW in line with other jurisdictions, as recommended by the NSW Auditor-General in 2018.

 

Further, speed camera enforcement has been recognised as one of the most effective measures to reduce speeding, save lives and prevent injuries. Research shows that best practice mobile speed camera programs with sufficient hours, a high number of enforcement sites, unmarked and unsigned operations and highly randomised deployment can deliver consistent, network-wide 20-30 per cent reductions in casualty crashes. Additionally, the independent modelling from Monash University Accident Research Centre identified that these enhancements to the NSW mobile speed camera program may save between 34 and 43 lives and prevent around 600 serious injuries in NSW each year.

 

There has been criticism for these changes with Wes Fang, a NSW Nationals state member of parliament, issuing a statement criticising the decision that he believed unfairly targets rural motorists, labelling the remove the speed camera warning signs as “an absolute disgrace and unfairly targets regional and rural motorists.” Mr Fang went on to say that “this policy decision puts the burden squarely on rural and regional motorists, who will be disproportionately targeted, given the longer distances and higher speed limits in the bush…Speed cameras have a place, but so do fair warning and equity between city and rural/regional people. This decision does not support that.”

 

Wondering what the penalties are for speeding?

If your vehicle is detected by a fixed speed camera, mobile speed camera or Police Officer and a penalty notice is issued, you will incur a fine and a deduction of demerit points.

Learner and P1 licence holders will have their licence suspended for at least three months for any speeding offence.

Some of the most common speeding offences and their penalties are as follows:

Full Licence Holders (excluding school zones) – Class A Vehicles

Exceed speed limit by: Demerit Points Light Vehicles Suspension period imposed by the RMS (RTA)
Not more than 10 km/h 1 $121
More than 10 km/h but not more than 20 km/h 3 $280
More than 20 km/h but not more than 30 km/h 4 $481
More than 30 km/h but not more than 45 km/h 5 $920 3 months (minimum)
More than 45 km/h 6 $2,482 6 months (minimum)

 

If the police catch you speeding by more than 45km/h over the limit you may have your licence immediately suspended and confiscated at the roadside for 6 months.

 

Learner. P1 and P2 (excluding school zones) – Class A Vehicles

Exceed speed limit by: Demerit Points Light Vehicles Suspension period imposed by the RMS (RTA)
Not more than 10 km/h (Learner, P1 or P2 licence holder) 4 $121 Learner, P1 – 3 months (minimum)
More than 10 km/h but not more than 20 km/h (Learner, P1 or P2 licence holder) 4 $280 Learner, P1 – 3 months (minimum)
More than 20 km/h but not more than 30 km/h 4 $481 Learner, P1 – 3 months (minimum)
30 km/h but not more than 45 km/h 5 $920 3 months automatic police suspension*
45 km/h and over 6 $2,482 6 months automatic police suspension*

 

* Only if police record the speed. A camera detected offence it is not an automatic suspension, however, the RMS will suspend the licence for the same period.

 

The penalties for other speeding offences can be viewed here.

 

Wondering where the fixed and mobile speed cameras are located in Newcastle?

The NSW Centre for Road Safety currently publishes the locations of all speed cameras on its website.

 

If you or someone you know needs advice or representation for an alleged criminal offence, contact the team at Hamilton Janke Lawyer 24 hours a day, seven days a week by calling 4038 1666.

 

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